Assessment Review

Jon Williamson, Managing Director, i-nfer assessment ltd, recently gave a summary of his views of the changes coming to assessment in the UK.  This is a summary of his summary …

There is pressure on the Government to change the approach to KS2 and KS3 assessment. An expert group was formed to provide advice to the Government on what to do before the implementation of the Rose Review. Published on 7 May, the report increases the focus on teacher assessment, whilst highlighting that making such assessment reliable and consistent is a key requirement. A key tool for managing this is Assessing Pupils Progress (APP).

Changes, that will come into play in September include:

  • KS2 National Curriculum tests will be moved to June, with no pressure for rapid marking;
  • All secondary schools will get will be Teacher Assessment from feeder primary schools;
  • APP will become increasingly important to support Teacher Assessment.
  • League tables will be replaced by a balanced scorecard approach (including functional skills qualifications)
  • Pupils with significant difference between their teacher assessed attainment and their NC test results will be a focus for discussions between secondary schools and their feeder primaries;
  • Science NC tests are to be discontinued.
  • We await a decision on whether the Single Level Tests are the future of KS2 assessment
  • There will be a system of national monitoring at KS3, probably based on the existing international surveys (e.g. TIMSS).
  • There is a recommendation that more assessment is carried out on computers.

ICT gets some mention – as it becomes more important through the implementation of the Rose Review it is to be assessed through rigorous teacher assessment rather than external tests.

These recommendations . All in all the focus of KS2 and KS3 assessment is shifting to trusting teachers’ assessment of their pupils, whilst providing frameworks such as APP to make this assessment valid and reliable.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: